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Vinexpo Daily - Day 4 Edition

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  • Vinexpo
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  • Bordeaux
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TRADE TALK PRESS CORNER

TRADE TALK PRESS CORNER Carolyn O’Grady-Gold is Acting Vice President, Products, Sales and Merchandising, LCBO (Liquor Control Board of Ontario). We asked her what she sees as being the most important trends in wine sales in her territory. Customers are really engaged with the local industry. Local VQA products and International Canadian Blend products, are both trending above the average for wines. On the imported side, customers are very engaged with wines from California, driven by the strength of key varietals: Cabernet and Chardonnay, as well as blends. New Zealand, with their focus on their signature style of premium Sauvignon Blanc, is also going from strength to strength. And the excellent value proposition that the Spanish wines offer resulted in sizeable gains made in the entire spectrum of offerings. Sparkling wines continue to be a source of expansion. Champagne and Prosecco drive the majority of growth with cherished hero brands. Although sparklers are a firmly rooted occasion based beverage (New Years’ Eve, special occasions), the LCBO is driving de-seasonalised consumption patterns through the marketing of sparkling wines for every-day occasions. Rosé wines have gained share over the past few years within our still wine portfolio. In addition to a large base of classic and approachable white Zinfandels, we are seeing growth in more subtle and sophisticated products, with a strong focus on France, Spain and Portugal and Ontario. We are also seeing growth in Moscato based rosé and sparkling rosé products of various levels of sweetness. Carolyn O’Grady-Gold Acting Vice President, Products, Sales and Merchandising, LCBO (Liquor Control Board of Ontario) The View from the Other Side of the Pond Felicity Carter Editor-in-chief of Meininger’s Wine Business International MEININGER’S VINEXPO New containers and sizes are creating incremental occasions for the wine category. From bag in boxes, or single serve wine in a can, consumers are given greater flexibility and choice of how, when and where to enjoy their beverages. What are you primarily looking for at Vinexpo Bordeaux? Vinexpo is an opportunity to do two key things: meet with our existing suppliers – to allow us to continue strengthening our trade relationships and grow our respective businesses, as well as investigate new opportunities – suppliers – trends – products, and innovations. What are your secrets for getting the best out of a busy show like Vinexpo? Plan ahead! Scheduling meetings in advance, researching diligently and being as prepared as possible allows us to maximize our time and get the most value out of our attendance. The Vinexpo website and the Vinexpo Daily are excellent resources for this. What are your thoughts about the official magazine, “Vinexpo Daily”? Vinexpo Daily is a great resource for attendees but also for those not attending and in the business. It’s a tool that we reference during the show to keep apprised of what’s happening at the show and in our industry • Felicity Carter is editor-in-chief of Meininger’s Wine Business International, an English language bi-monthly magazine published in Germany. We asked her why Vinexpo Bordeaux is so important for her. My magazine covers the global wine trade, looking at what’s happening on both the wine production side and also on the market. It’s therefore very important that I visit Vinexpo, as it offers a great opportunity to catch up with significant people. One of the nicest things about Vinexpo is that it’s got the best food of any of the trade fairs, which makes it a pleasure to meet people over lunch or a coffee. What do you see as the main issues facing the global wine industry now and over the next 12 months? What I’m expecting to see is a continuation of the two major trends of the past couple of years: the unstoppable rise of sparkling wine and rosé. There’s also a growing interest in autochthonous varieties. As a journalist, what tips do you have for visitors to make the most of the show? Anybody visiting Vinexpo needs to make as many appointments in advance as possible. Vinexpo is slightly more formal than other trade fairs, and it’s more difficult to just drop in on stands. My other tip would be to leave time in the schedule to visit Bordeaux itself, which is a jewel box of a city • 6 VINEXPO DAILY / DAY 4 EDITION / WEDNESDAY 21 st JUNE 2017

EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW “All we want to do is make quality wine” As both a winemaker and viticulturist, Julian Viaud is unique amongst wine consultant Michel Rolland’s team Michel Rolland is arguably the most famous and influential wine consultant in the world. But behind him is a five-strong team helping him to work with a network of wineries and vineyards around the world that stretches from Argentina, through India and into the depths of southern China. We caught up with one of them, Julian Viaud, who is at Vinexpo helping to promote the work the Rolland team is doing to develop Grands Chais de France’s Bordeaux wines. How long have you been working with Michel Rolland and how did you link up? I have been working with him for 11 years now. Previously I had been the general manager of a small winery in the south of France which was such a good experience as I learnt everything there is to do in a vineyard and in a winery. I spent four years there and started off not knowing anything and finished up working for Michel Rolland. I think it is because I was able to bring both winemaking and viticulturist skills to his team. I am the only one in the team that can do both. How do you and the rest of the consulting team work with Michel Rolland? I think people are surprised to find out that there are only five people working with Michel Rolland. Particularly when you realise we are consulting for 300 different vineyards in 23 countries. Where different members of the team work is mainly split between those who can speak English and those who can speak Spanish. But whatever projects we are on, we all work collaboratively and it is a very connected team. Which countries do you personally work in? I am currently working in China, India, Russian Lebanon, Italy and Bordeaux. It is really interesting to see the differences between the countries. But you have to remember the two most important factors when working with any winery, regardless of where they are, is its terroir and the people. They are different everywhere you go. You have to be good at learning and understanding new cultural skills and how to connect with the people where you are working. Is there a Michel Rolland recipe for making wine? Not at all. We have no rules. Our philosophy no matter where we are working is to make good wine that you can drink and sell. After all being able to sell the wine you make is the most important. So if you are in an area that makes good fruity wine then that is the wine you have to try and make. Can you explain the work you have been doing with Grand Chais de France and its Bordeaux chateaux? Yes, we started working with Grands Chais de France’s five Bordeaux chateaux in about 2008. We work very closely and collaborate with Grand Chais de France’s winemaking team. It is important to make clear that OUR PHILOSOPHY NO MATTER WHERE WE ARE WORKING IS TO MAKE GOOD WINE THAT YOU CAN DRINK AND SELL. we are not making the wine, but are there to offer an independent view. Whilst they are concerned about every day issues, we can come in and give them a different view. We want to help them make wines that are the true expression of that region and that terroir. But they are the winemaker, we are the consultant. How does that work? Our philosophy is to go deeply in to all the details, where we might make lots of little changes that all add up to make a better wine. Grands Chais de France is very committed to making great quality wine. Every year I will present three blends from a property, the first being the best quality, the second is OK and the third is slightly less quality. It always goes for the first blend • Julian Viaud Winemaker and viticulturist, Michel Rolland team VINEXPO DAILY / DAY 4 EDITION / WEDNESDAY 21 st JUNE 2017 7